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Reblogged from vicomtesse
Reblogged from maggie-stiefvater

maggie-stiefvater:

maggie-stiefvater:

Novelist error messages.

reblogging my own error messages because I’m laughing gently at myself for thinking authors outgrow these things ha ha never ha what is writing ha how do you word at people

Reblogged from romanovsa

I feel like I’m a terrible gushing chap. Jenna has been absolutely incredible. My favourite thing about joining Doctor Who has been working with Jenna. She does everything with such grace and class.” - Peter Capaldi

(Source: romanovsa, via arthurpendragonns)

Reblogged from maggie-stiefvater

maggie-stiefvater:

This is the problem with making your car one of your horcruxes.

On Friday, I got my first giant migraine in a long time, and as it slowly turned me into a neurological unicorn, the Camaro began to slowly idle slower and slower at traffic lights. As I descended further into madness and migraine pharmaceuticals, Loki sickened further.

Last night we both died at the same time.

I couldn’t believe that after 4,000 miles and countless roadside repairs, L.A. was the thing that finally killed us both. Actually, I can totally believe it.

We had it towed to an autoshop that was closed because it was a time of night that only wizards are awake, and I left a note on the dash. You can’t really read it, but it starts with “Hola, I am a Camaro” and ends somewhere around “exorcism.”

This is why I love Maggie

Reblogged from wesleyhill

So can one be gay and Christian or not? Our culture presents us with two simple options. Either we lie down and allow ourselves to be bulldozed by the agenda of militant gay activists, or we completely reject and demonize every aspect of gay identity, culture, and experience. Christians ought to eschew both options. Instead, we should identify which aspects of being gay contribute to the flourishing of gay people as individuals and to the flourishing of their communities. We should also identify without fear those aspects of contemporary gay identity and culture that are incompatible with the Christian moral life.

Most importantly, we ought to show how those aspects of being gay that do contribute to human flourishing would be enhanced, rather than diminished, by embracing the Church’s message of chastity. In other words, chastity is not a demand that gay people give up happiness now in the hope of pie in the sky when they die. Quite the opposite: Gays and lesbians can most truly be the people that God created them to be precisely by following Jesus. The message they hear from the Church should never be “hate your own sexuality or burn in hell,” but “Jesus has a gift of abundant life to give which will make you happier in the next world and in this life if you follow the path he sets out.”

Aaron Taylor, “Can One Be Gay and Christian?” I had occasion today to revisit this essay by my friend, and I wanted to post it here again as a way of saying that I still find it to be one of the wisest, sanest, godliest things I’ve read on the topic. It sums up the approach a lot of us are trying to take over at SpiritualFriendship.org. Thanks again, Aaron, for writing this piece. (via wesleyhill)

This

Reblogged from wesleyhill

Lillian is a tonic. She understands, for instance, that the phenomenal popularity of “Celtic” services being held for all comers, with open communion for the unbaptized, is not going to strengthen the faltering churches. Her voice is valuable and much needed. She does not, however, seem particularly interested in The Great Tradition (aka generous orthodoxy) of the church, but rather, in what the church asks of its people — and more power to her on that. Doctrine, however, still lies at the heart of what it means to be a Christian. As soon as one becomes unmoored from the Great Tradition of biblical interpretation and Christian doctrine, there are unnumbered, treacherous currents, tides, and rocks to get lost in or run aground on. Moving away from the church (with all its all-too-obvious defects) means exchanging one flawed organism for another — oneself. Pelagius was a Christian, a very serious one, but the teaching that Augustine was dead set against was his tendency to substitute human agency for divine agency.

In the end, it’s about God. Who is God, and what difference does that make? There are a number of dangers in the Pelagian route, but perhaps the primary route out of biblical faith is the redefining of the identity and nature of God. It is simply tragic that the issue defining the various parties in the church today is same-sex unions. The passions surrounding this debate have almost entirely obscured the all-important questions of Christology and the role of Scripture in an age when an unprecedented number of books and media messages are bent on undermining the church’s ancient confession that Jesus Christ is Lord.

Fleming Rutledge (via wesleyhill)

(via wesleyhill)

Reblogged from writingquotes
To produce a mighty book, you must choose a mighty theme. Herman Melville (via writingquotes)
Reblogged from mentalhealthnostigma

mujertropical:

donnaluna:

oliviatheelf:

too-kawaii-to-die:

I don’t care what kind of blog I have I will blog this no matter what.

"Craving sensation: feeling unreal" was such a huge part of the beginning of my relapse. I was convinced that people in front of me didn’t even exist and I kept touching things and trying to feel sensation. I’m reblogging because I know that that was so horrifying for me and I never want anyone else to go through it. 

Just in case this can help someone. Some suggestions also seem harmful (eating a hot pepper really hurts!!!) but steps to feeling better and not self harming is most important. Sending you love and light

STOP SCROLLING! Please reblog this vitally important information because at least one of your followers is self-harming. Thank you!

(Source: mentalhealthnostigma, via maggie-stiefvater)

Reblogged from vicomtesse

Anne of Austria was then twenty-six or twenty-seven years of age; that is to say, she was in the full splendor of her beauty.Her carriage was that of a queen or a goddess; her eyes, which cast the brilliancy of emeralds, were perfectly beautiful, and yet were at the same time full of sweetness and majesty.Her mouth was small and rosy; and although her underlip, like that of all princes of the House of Austria, protruded slightly beyond the other, it was eminently lovely in its smile, but as profoundly disdainful in its contempt.Her skin was admired for its velvety softness; her hands and arms were of surpassing beauty, all the poets of the time singing them as incomparable.Lastly, her hair, which, from being light in her youth, had become chestnut, and which she wore curled very plainly, and with much powder, admirably set off her face, in which the most rigid critic could only have desired a little less rouge, and the most fastidious sculptor a little more fineness in the nose.

Anne of Austria was then twenty-six or twenty-seven years of age; that is to say, she was in the full splendor of her beauty.
Her carriage was that of a queen or a goddess; her eyes, which cast the brilliancy of emeralds, were perfectly beautiful, and yet were at the same time full of sweetness and majesty.
Her mouth was small and rosy; and although her underlip, like that of all princes of the House of Austria, protruded slightly beyond the other, it was eminently lovely in its smile, but as profoundly disdainful in its contempt.
Her skin was admired for its velvety softness; her hands and arms were of surpassing beauty, all the poets of the time singing them as incomparable.
Lastly, her hair, which, from being light in her youth, had become chestnut, and which she wore curled very plainly, and with much powder, admirably set off her face, in which the most rigid critic could only have desired a little less rouge, and the most fastidious sculptor a little more fineness in the nose.

(Source: vicomtesse, via inaramiswetrust)

Reblogged from vampire-originals

The Vampire Diaries Exclusive: Bonnie and Damon’s Comic-Con Plea