Untitled



Reblogged from lazoey
Matt Smith being adorable

Matt Smith being adorable

(via mattsnogbox)

Reblogged from dominiquewesson

dominiquewesson:

"The Infernal Devices" Will Herondale and Tessa Gray

Wacom Intuos Pen&Touch
Photoshop CS2, about 25 hours.

This is beautiful

(via cassandraclare)

Reblogged from danascullys
Reblogged from fandlemonium
smile-youre-amazing:

fandlemonium:

Hermione Granger inspired scented candle!
Scents are layered, from top to bottom: new parchment, fresh cut grass, and spearmint.
Click image to purchase!

I LOVE THIS MORE THAN WORDS CAN EXPRESS

smile-youre-amazing:

fandlemonium:

Hermione Granger inspired scented candle!

Scents are layered, from top to bottom: new parchment, fresh cut grass, and spearmint.

Click image to purchase!

I LOVE THIS MORE THAN WORDS CAN EXPRESS

(via everythingharrypotter)

Reblogged from writingquotes
You don’t actually have to write anything until you’ve thought it out. This is an enormous relief, and you can sit there searching for the point at which the story becomes a toboggan and starts to slide. Marie de Nervaud (via writingquotes)

Nice

Reblogged from lauhfeyson

The Doctor is wonderful

(Source: lauhfeyson, via arthurpendragonns)

Reblogged from nickigabriel
Love

Love

Reblogged from twinkleofafadingstar

twinkleofafadingstar:

so Charlotte Bronte read Emma by Jane Austen and was really interested in this minor character named Jane Fairfax who was poor and would have been a governess had she not married well and then Bronte wrote her own novel exploring the plight of the poor governess who married this guy named Edward Fairfax Rochester in a novel called Jane Eyre and my point is don’t let anyone tell you shit about fanfiction.

What?!

Reblogged from theatlantic
theatlantic:

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators

Like most writers, I am an inveterate procrastinator. In the course of writing this one article, I have checked my e-mail approximately 3,000 times, made and discarded multiple grocery lists, conducted a lengthy Twitter battle over whether the gold standard is actually the worst economic policy ever proposed, written Facebook messages to schoolmates I haven’t seen in at least a decade, invented a delicious new recipe for chocolate berry protein smoothies, and googled my own name several times to make sure that I have at least once written something that someone would actually want to read.
Lots of people procrastinate, of course, but for writers it is a peculiarly common occupational hazard. One book editor I talked to fondly reminisced about the first book she was assigned to work on, back in the late 1990s. It had gone under contract in 1972.
I once asked a talented and fairly famous colleague how he managed to regularly produce such highly regarded 8,000 word features. “Well,” he said, “first, I put it off for two or three weeks. Then I sit down to write. That’s when I get up and go clean the garage. After that, I go upstairs, and then I come back downstairs and complain to my wife for a couple of hours. Finally, but only after a couple more days have passed and I’m really freaking out about missing my deadline, I ultimately sit down and write.”
Over the years, I developed a theory about why writers are such procrastinators: We were too good in English class. This sounds crazy, but hear me out.
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]



Love this!

theatlantic:

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators

Like most writers, I am an inveterate procrastinator. In the course of writing this one article, I have checked my e-mail approximately 3,000 times, made and discarded multiple grocery lists, conducted a lengthy Twitter battle over whether the gold standard is actually the worst economic policy ever proposed, written Facebook messages to schoolmates I haven’t seen in at least a decade, invented a delicious new recipe for chocolate berry protein smoothies, and googled my own name several times to make sure that I have at least once written something that someone would actually want to read.

Lots of people procrastinate, of course, but for writers it is a peculiarly common occupational hazard. One book editor I talked to fondly reminisced about the first book she was assigned to work on, back in the late 1990s. It had gone under contract in 1972.

I once asked a talented and fairly famous colleague how he managed to regularly produce such highly regarded 8,000 word features. “Well,” he said, “first, I put it off for two or three weeks. Then I sit down to write. That’s when I get up and go clean the garage. After that, I go upstairs, and then I come back downstairs and complain to my wife for a couple of hours. Finally, but only after a couple more days have passed and I’m really freaking out about missing my deadline, I ultimately sit down and write.”

Over the years, I developed a theory about why writers are such procrastinators: We were too good in English class. This sounds crazy, but hear me out.

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

Love this!

(via poetgirl925)